Table of Contents
Computational Biology Journal
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 909268, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/909268
Research Article

Identification of Plant Homologues of Dual Specificity Yak1-Related Kinases

1Department of Genomics and Molecular Biotechnology, Institute of Food Biotechnology and Genomics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Osipovskogo Street 2a, Kyiv 04123, Ukraine
2Department of General and Molecular Genetics, Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv (KNU), Glushkova Street 2, Kyiv 02090, Ukraine

Received 28 April 2014; Revised 16 September 2014; Accepted 25 September 2014; Published 8 December 2014

Academic Editor: Mihaly Mezei

Copyright © 2014 Pavel Karpov et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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