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Critical Care Research and Practice
Volume 2010, Article ID 917053, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/917053
Research Article

Two-Hour Lactate Clearance Predicts Negative Outcome in Patients with Cardiorespiratory Insufficiency

1Emergency Department, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, Australia
2Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, University of Trieste, Trieste 34123, Italy
3Department of Emergency Medicine and Critical Care, San Paolo Hospital, Naples, Italy

Received 23 September 2009; Accepted 23 May 2010

Academic Editor: Robert Boots

Copyright © 2010 Sean Scott et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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