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Critical Care Research and Practice
Volume 2012, Article ID 473507, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/473507
Review Article

Monitoring in the Intensive Care

1Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Lille University Teaching Hospital, Rue Michel Polonowski, 59037 Lille, France
2Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697, USA
3Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
4Geneva Medical School, 1211 Geneva 14, Switzerland
5Centre de Recherche en Nutrition Humaine Auvergne, UMR 1019 Nutrition Humaine, INRA, Clermont Université, Service de Nutrition Clinique, CHU de Clermont-Ferrand, 63009 Clermont-Ferrand, France
6Intensive Care Division, Geneva University Hospitals, 1211 Geneva 14, Switzerland

Received 7 May 2012; Accepted 21 June 2012

Academic Editor: Daniel De Backer

Copyright © 2012 Eric Kipnis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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