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Critical Care Research and Practice
Volume 2012, Article ID 536852, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/536852
Clinical Study

Persistent Sepsis-Induced Hypotension without Hyperlactatemia: A Distinct Clinical and Physiological Profile within the Spectrum of Septic Shock

1Department of Translational Physiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands
2Departamento de Medicina Intensiva, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Marcoleta 367, 8320000 Santiago, Chile

Received 20 December 2011; Revised 8 February 2012; Accepted 2 March 2012

Academic Editor: Michael Piagnerelli

Copyright © 2012 Glenn Hernandez et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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