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Critical Care Research and Practice
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 614545, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/614545
Review Article

Thrombomodulin: A Bifunctional Modulator of Inflammation and Coagulation in Sepsis

1Department of Molecular Pathobiology and Cell Adhesion Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Mie University, 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu 514-8507, Japan
2Department of Anesthesiology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, 1-3-3 Nakamichi, Higashinari-ku, Osaka 537-8511, Japan
3Faculty of Pharmaceutical Science, Suzuka University of Medical Science, 3500-3 Minamitamagaki-cho, Suzuka City 513-8679, Japan

Received 30 September 2011; Revised 1 December 2011; Accepted 1 December 2011

Academic Editor: Edward A. Abraham

Copyright © 2012 Takayuki Okamoto et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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