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Critical Care Research and Practice
Volume 2012, Article ID 702956, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/702956
Review Article

Alterations of the Erythrocyte Membrane during Sepsis

1Department of Intensive Care, CHU-Charleroi, Université Libre de Bruxelles, 92, Boulevard Janson, 6000 Charleroi, Belgium
2Experimental Medicine Laboratory, CHU-Charleroi, ULB 222 Unit, 6110 Montigny-le-Tilleul, Belgium

Received 9 January 2012; Revised 27 February 2012; Accepted 18 March 2012

Academic Editor: Arnaldo Dubin

Copyright © 2012 Yasmina Serroukh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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