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Critical Care Research and Practice
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 867176, 3 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/867176
Editorial

Microcirculation

1Department of Intensive Care, CHU-Charleroi, Université Libre de Bruxelles, 92, Boulevard Janson, 6000 Charleroi, Belgium
2Experimental Medicine Laboratory, CHU-Charleroi, 6110 Montigny-le-Tilleul, Belgium
3Department of Intensive Care, Erasmus Medical Center, University Medical Center, P.O. Box 2040, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands
4Department of Translational Physiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands
5Servicio de Terapia Intensiva, Sanatorio Otamendi y Miroli 870, C1115AAB Buenos Aires, Argentina
6Catedra de Farmacologia Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Argentina

Received 16 September 2012; Accepted 16 September 2012

Copyright © 2012 Michael Piagnerelli et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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