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Critical Care Research and Practice
Volume 2014, Article ID 682621, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/682621
Research Article

The Effect of a Nurse-Led Multidisciplinary Team on Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia Rates

1School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Amarillo, TX 79106, USA
2Adult Critical Care Services, Northwest Texas Hospital, Amarillo, TX 79106, USA
3Infection Control, Northwest Texas Hospital, Amarillo, TX 79106, USA
4Respiratory Care, Northwest Texas Hospital, Amarillo, TX 79106, USA
5Department of surgery, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Amarillo, TX 79106, USA
6Section of Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, 1400 S. Coulter Street, Amarillo, TX 79106, USA

Received 23 March 2014; Revised 6 June 2014; Accepted 10 June 2014; Published 29 June 2014

Academic Editor: Robert Boots

Copyright © 2014 W. Bradley Dosher et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a worrisome, yet potentially preventable threat in critically ill patients. Evidence-based clinical practices targeting the prevention of VAP have proven effective, but the most optimal methods to ensure consistent implementation and compliance remain unknown. Methods. A retrospective study of the trend in VAP rates in a community-hospital’s open medical intensive care unit (MICU) after the enactment of a nurse-led VAP prevention team. The period of the study was between April 1, 2009, and September 30, 2012. The team rounded on mechanically ventilated patients every Tuesday and Thursday. They ensured adherence to the evidence-based VAP prevention. A separate and independent infection control team monitored VAP rates. Results. Across the study period, mean VAP rate was 3.20/1000 ventilator days ±5.71 SD. Throughout the study time frame, there was an average monthly reduction in VAP rate of 0.27/1000 ventilator days, (CI: −0.40–−0.13). Conclusion. A nurse-led interdisciplinary team dedicated to VAP prevention rounding twice a week to ensure adherence with a VAP prevention bundle lowered VAP rates in a community-hospital open MICU. The team had interdepartmental and administrative support and addressed any deficiencies in the VAP prevention bundle components actively.