Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Critical Care Research and Practice
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 5765202, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5765202
Research Article

Blood Lactate Is a Useful Indicator for the Medical Emergency Team

1Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Östersund Hospital, 83183 Östersund, Sweden
2Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, 90185 Umeå, Sweden
3Department of Surgical Sciences, Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Uppsala University, 75185 Uppsala, Sweden
4Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Unit of Research, Education and Development-Östersund, Umeå University, 83183 Östersund, Sweden

Received 30 November 2015; Revised 2 February 2016; Accepted 7 February 2016

Academic Editor: Samuel A. Tisherman

Copyright © 2016 Maria Schollin-Borg et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. T. C. Jansen, J. van Bommel, and J. Bakker, “Blood lactate monitoring in critically ill patients: a systematic health technology assessment,” Critical Care Medicine, vol. 37, no. 10, pp. 2827–2839, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. M. E. Mikkelsen, A. N. Miltiades, D. F. Gaieski et al., “Serum lactate is associated with mortality in severe sepsis independent of organ failure and shock,” Critical Care Medicine, vol. 37, no. 5, pp. 1670–1677, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. N. I. Shapiro, M. D. Howell, D. Talmor et al., “Serum lactate as a predictor of mortality in emergency department patients with infection,” Annals of Emergency Medicine, vol. 45, no. 5, pp. 524–528, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. H. B. Nguyen, M. Loomba, J. J. Yang et al., “Early lactate clearance is associated with biomarkers of inflammation, coagulation, apoptosis, organ dysfunction and mortality in severe sepsis and septic shock,” Journal of Inflammation, vol. 7, article 6, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. H. Khosravani, R. Shahpori, H. T. Thomas, A. W. Kirkpatrick, and K. B. Laupland, “Occurrence and adverse effect on outcome of hyperlactatemia in the critically ill,” Critical Care, vol. 13, no. 3, article R90, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. A. D. Nichol, M. Egi, V. Pettila et al., “Relative hyperlactatemia and hospital mortality in critically ill patients: a retrospective multi-centre study,” Critical Care, vol. 14, no. 1, article R25, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. B. R. Widgren and M. Grunstra, “Serum lactate—useful indicator in emergency care,” Läkartidningen, vol. 108, no. 9, pp. 475–477, 2011. View at Google Scholar
  8. D. A. del Portal, F. Shofer, M. E. Mikkelsen et al., “Emergency department lactate is associated with mortality in older adults admitted with and without infections,” Academic Emergency Medicine, vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 260–268, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. C. Barfod, L. H. Lundstrøm, M. M. Lauritzen et al., “Peripheral venous lactate at admission is associated with in-hospital mortality, a prospective cohort study,” Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, vol. 59, no. 4, pp. 514–523, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  10. A. Lee, G. Bishop, K. M. Hillman, and K. Daffurn, “The medical emergency team,” Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, vol. 23, no. 2, pp. 183–186, 1995. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. R. J. M. Morgan, F. Williams, and M. Wright, “An early warning scoring system for detecting developing critical illness,” Clinical Intensive Care, vol. 8, article 100, 1997. View at Google Scholar
  12. J. L. Quach, A. W. Downey, M. Haase, A. Haase-Fielitz, D. Jones, and R. Bellomo, “Characteristics and outcomes of patients receiving a medical emergency team review for respiratory distress or hypotension,” Journal of Critical Care, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 325–331, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. G. Jäderling, M. Bell, C.-R. Martling, A. Ekbom, and D. Konrad, “Limitations of medical treatment among patients attended by the rapid response team,” Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, vol. 57, no. 10, pp. 1268–1274, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. D. Konrad, G. Jäderling, M. Bell, F. Granath, A. Ekbom, and C.-R. Martling, “Reducing in-hospital cardiac arrests and hospital mortality by introducing a medical emergency team,” Intensive Care Medicine, vol. 36, no. 1, pp. 100–106, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. D. Rixen and J. H. Siegel, “Bench-to-bedside review: oxygen debt and its metabolic correlates as quantifiers of the severity of hemorrhagic and posttraumatic shock,” Critical Care, vol. 9, no. 5, pp. 441–453, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. M. D. Howell, M. Donnino, P. Clardy, D. Talmor, and N. I. Shapiro, “Occult hypoperfusion and mortality in patients with suspected infection,” Intensive Care Medicine, vol. 33, no. 11, pp. 1892–1899, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. G. A. Harrison, T. Jacques, M.-L. McLaws, and G. Kilborn, “Combinations of early signs of critical illness predict in-hospital death-the SOCCER study (signs of critical conditions and emergency responses),” Resuscitation, vol. 71, no. 3, pp. 327–334, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. D. Jones, M. DeVita, and S. Warrillow, “Ten clinical indicators suggesting the need for ICU admission after Rapid Response Team review,” Intensive Care Medicine, vol. 42, no. 2, pp. 261–263, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  19. M. A. Cretikos, R. Bellomo, K. Hillman, J. Chen, S. Finfer, and A. Flabouris, “Respiratory rate: the neglected vital sign,” Medical Journal of Australia, vol. 188, no. 11, pp. 657–659, 2008. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. H. Farley, M. T. Zubrow, J. Gies et al., “Emergency department tachypnea predicts transfer to a higher level of care in the first 24 hours after ED admission,” Academic Emergency Medicine, vol. 17, no. 7, pp. 718–722, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. J. F. Fieselmann, M. S. Hendryx, C. M. Helms, and D. S. Wakefield, “Respiratory rate predicts cardiopulmonary arrest for internal medicine inpatients,” Journal of General Internal Medicine, vol. 8, no. 7, pp. 354–360, 1993. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus