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Child Development Research
Volume 2011, Article ID 907601, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/907601
Research Article

Representation of Multiple Durations in Children and Adults

Department of Psychology, Umeå University, 901 87 Umeå, Sweden

Received 16 August 2011; Revised 14 November 2011; Accepted 18 December 2011

Academic Editor: Jeffrey W. Fagen

Copyright © 2011 Maria Grazia Carelli and Helen Forman. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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