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Child Development Research
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 170310, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/170310
Research Article

Primary School Age Students' Spontaneous Comments about Math Reveal Emerging Dispositions Linked to Later Mathematics Achievement

1Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota, 51 East River Parkway, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
2Johns Hopkins University School of Education, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
3Department of Educational Foundations, Millersville University of Pennsylvania, P.O. Box 1002, Millersville, PA 17551, USA
4Department of Psychology, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106-7123, USA

Received 12 June 2012; Revised 10 August 2012; Accepted 10 August 2012

Academic Editor: Ann Dowker

Copyright © 2012 Michèle M. M. Mazzocco et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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