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Child Development Research
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 684157, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/684157
Research Article

What They Want and What They Get: Self-Reported Motives, Perceived Competence, and Relatedness in Adolescent Leisure Activities

1Department of Health Promotion and Development, Faculty of Psychology, University of Bergen, P.O. Box 7807, 5020 Bergen, Norway
2Faculty of Humanities, Social Sciences and Education, University of Tromsø, 9037 Tromsø, Norway

Received 6 December 2011; Revised 13 April 2012; Accepted 25 April 2012

Academic Editor: Cheryl Dissanayake

Copyright © 2012 Ingrid Leversen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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