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Child Development Research
Volume 2013, Article ID 296039, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/296039
Research Article

Naturalistic Observations of Nonverbal Children with Autism: A Study of Intentional Communicative Acts in the Classroom

1Department of Psychology, University of Chester, Parkgate Road, Chester CH1 4BJ, UK
2School of Psychology, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, Elizabeth Fry Building 1.10, Norwich NR4 7TJ, UK

Received 20 March 2013; Revised 9 June 2013; Accepted 11 June 2013

Academic Editor: Cheryl Dissanayake

Copyright © 2013 Samantha Drain and Paul E. Engelhardt. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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