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Child Development Research
Volume 2013, Article ID 298603, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/298603
Research Article

A Bidirectional Relationship between Conceptual Organization and Word Learning

1Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, ON, Canada P7B 5E1
2University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
3New York University, New York, NY 10012, USA

Received 13 August 2013; Revised 6 November 2013; Accepted 7 November 2013

Academic Editor: Olga Capirci

Copyright © 2013 Tanya Kaefer and Susan B. Neuman. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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