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Child Development Research
Volume 2014, Article ID 450734, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/450734
Research Article

Role of Working Memory Storage and Attention Focus Switching in Children’s Comprehension of Spoken Object Relative Sentences

1Communication Sciences and Disorders, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701, USA
2Communication Disorders and Deaf Education, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322, USA
3Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75080, USA

Received 2 March 2014; Revised 30 April 2014; Accepted 30 April 2014; Published 20 May 2014

Academic Editor: Nobuo Masataka

Copyright © 2014 Mianisha C. Finney et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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