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Child Development Research
Volume 2014, Article ID 498506, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/498506
Research Article

Student Engagement in After-School Programs, Academic Skills, and Social Competence among Elementary School Students

Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, 1360 Peachtree Street NE, Suite 1020, Atlanta, GA 30309, USA

Received 29 January 2014; Accepted 3 March 2014; Published 10 April 2014

Academic Editor: Xinyin Chen

Copyright © 2014 Kathryn E. Grogan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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