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Child Development Research
Volume 2015, Article ID 902584, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/902584
Research Article

Microdevelopment of Complex Featural and Spatial Integration with Contextual Support

1Department of Psychology, Salem State University, 325 Lafayette Street, Salem, MA 01970, USA
2Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, 528 Wilson Hall, Nashville, TN 37235, USA

Received 31 July 2015; Revised 17 September 2015; Accepted 21 September 2015

Academic Editor: Olga Capirci

Copyright © 2015 Pamela L. Hirsch and Elisabeth Hollister Sandberg. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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