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Child Development Research
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 3102481, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3102481
Research Article

Infants Actively Construct and Update Their Representations of Physical Events: Evidence from Change Detection by 12-Month-Olds

University of California, Santa Cruz, CA, USA

Received 30 April 2016; Revised 30 September 2016; Accepted 20 October 2016

Academic Editor: Gedeon Deak

Copyright © 2016 Su-hua Wang and Elizabeth J. Goldman. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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