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Child Development Research
Volume 2016, Article ID 5270924, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5270924
Research Article

Appearances Are Deceiving: Observing the World as It Looks and How It Really Is—Theory of Mind Performances Investigated in 3-, 4-, and 5-Year-Old Children

Department of Education and Psychology, University of Florence, Florence, Italy

Received 6 July 2016; Revised 24 September 2016; Accepted 7 November 2016

Academic Editor: Randal X. Moldrich

Copyright © 2016 Lucia Bigozzi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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