Child Development Research

The Development of Attitudes and Emotions Related to Mathematics


Publishing date
28 Sep 2012
Status
Published
Submission deadline
11 May 2012

Lead Editor

1University of Oxford, UK

2University of Nevada at Las Vegas, USA

3RWTH University of Aachen, Germany


The Development of Attitudes and Emotions Related to Mathematics

Description

Mathematical development is an important topic of study, both from the point of view of understanding the nature of cognitive development and from a practical point of view. Large numbers of people experience difficulties in acquiring numeracy, which often persist into adulthood, with serious social and occupational consequences. At best, numeracy difficulties restrict career choices; at worst, they are associated with unemployment, low pay, and increased risk of a variety of negative outcomes, ranging from ill health to criminal convictions.

Some aspects of mathematics appear to be cognitively difficult for many people to acquire, and some people have severe specific mathematical learning disabilities (dyscalculia). However, not all mathematical disabilities result from cognitive difficulties. A substantial number of children and adults have mathematics anxiety, which may severely disrupt their mathematical learning and performance, both by causing avoidance of mathematical activities and by overloading and disrupting working memory during mathematical tasks. Other negative attitudes to mathematics are also common, especially in some societies, for example, that mathematics is unimportant or “not cool.” By contrast, some people have very positive attitudes and derive great enjoyment from mathematics. On the whole, studies suggest that attitudes to mathematics tend to deteriorate with age during childhood and adolescence, which has worrying implications for mathematical development and mathematics education.

It is important to understand children's attitudes to mathematics if we are both to understand the nature of mathematical development and to remove important barriers to learning and progress in this subject. Moreover, the study of attitudes to mathematics may offer important insights into the relationships between emotional and cognitive development.

We invite investigators to contribute original research articles as well as review articles that will stimulate and enhance the understanding of the development of attitudes to mathematics, mathematics-related emotions, including but not restricted to mathematics anxiety, and the relationships between attitudes and emotions and mathematical development and learning. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Recent developments in research on the nature and causes of mathematics anxiety
  • Methods of measuring attitudes to mathematics in children
  • Relationships between affect and cognition in mathematical development
  • Social, educational, and cultural influences on attitudes to mathematics
  • The nature and development of self-efficacy in mathematics
  • Positive attitudes to mathematics: the development of mathematics enjoyment
  • Gender and the development of attitudes to mathematics
  • The neuroscience of emotions related to mathematics
  • Emotional correlates and consequences of mathematical disabilities in children

Before submission authors should carefully read over the journal's Author Guidelines, which are located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/cdr/guidelines/. Prospective authors should submit an electronic copy of their complete manuscript through the journal Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/ according to the following timetable:


Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 238435
  • - Editorial

The Development of Attitudes and Emotions Related to Mathematics

Ann Dowker | Mark Ashcraft | Helga Krinzinger
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 610192
  • - Research Article

Math Anxiety Questionnaire: Similar Latent Structure in Brazilian and German School Children

Guilherme Wood | Pedro Pinheiro-Chagas | ... | Vitor Geraldi Haase
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 396071
  • - Research Article

Beliefs, Anxiety, and Avoiding Failure in Mathematics

Steve Chinn
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 124939
  • - Research Article

Attitudes to Mathematics in Primary School Children

Ann Dowker | Karina Bennett | Louise Smith
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 813920
  • - Research Article

Instructional Quality and Attitudes toward Mathematics: Do Self-Concept and Interest Differ across Students' Patterns of Perceived Instructional Quality in Mathematics Classrooms?

Rebecca Lazarides | Angela Ittel
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 359089
  • - Research Article

Relationships between 9-Year-Olds' Math and Literacy Worries and Academic Abilities

Laura Punaro | Robert Reeve
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 170310
  • - Research Article

Primary School Age Students' Spontaneous Comments about Math Reveal Emerging Dispositions Linked to Later Mathematics Achievement

Michèle M. M. Mazzocco | Laurie B. Hanich | Maia M. Noeder
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 982672
  • - Research Article

Math Self-Assessment, but Not Negative Feelings, Predicts Mathematics Performance of Elementary School Children

Vitor Geraldi Haase | Annelise Júlio-Costa | ... | Guilherme Wood
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 851657
  • - Research Article

Parents' Beliefs about Children's Math Development and Children's Participation in Math Activities

Susan Sonnenschein | Claudia Galindo | ... | Heather Lewis
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 459385
  • - Research Article

Children's Use of Arithmetic Shortcuts: The Role of Attitudes in Strategy Choice

Katherine M. Robinson | Adam K. Dubé

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