Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research
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Balance as an Additional Effect of Strength and Flexibility Aquatic Training in Sedentary Lifestyle Elderly Women

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Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research publishes research based on molecular, cellular, organismal aspects of gerontological research and in diagnosis, treatment, evaluation and educational aspects of geriatrics research.

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Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Research Article

A Scoping Review on the Attributes of Cluster Randomized Controlled Trials in Long-Term Care Facilities

Cluster randomized trial design, where groups of participants are randomized instead of individual participants, is increasingly being used in long-term care research. The purpose of this review was to determine the characteristics of cluster randomized trials in long-term care facilities. A medical librarian conducted the literature search. Two independent reviewers reviewed each paper. Studies were included if the design was cluster randomized and participants were from long-term care facilities. For each included study, two independent data extractors captured data on study attributes, including: journal, location, year published, author discipline, funding, methodology, number of participants, and intervention target. The literature search yielded 7,679 unique studies, with 195 studies meeting the selection criteria and being included for data extraction. The included studies were published between 1976 and 2017, with 53% of studies published after 2009. The term cluster randomized was in the title of only 45% of the studies. The studies were conducted worldwide; the United States had the largest number of studies (23%), followed by the United Kingdom (18%). Ten percent of studies were published in journals with an impact factor >10. The most frequent discipline of the first and last authors was medicine (34%), followed by nursing (17%). Forty-nine percent of the studies had government funding, while only 20% had medical industry funding. In studies with <1000 residents, 85% of the studies obtained consent from the resident and/or their proxy, while in studies with ≥ 1000 residents, it was 31%. The most frequent intervention targets were infection (13%), falls/fracture (13%), and behavior/physical restraint (13%). Cluster randomized controlled trials in long-term care have a unique set of characteristics. Results of this review will provide guidance to researchers conducting studies in long-term care facilities.

Research Article

Medication Consumption Patterns and Polypharmacy among Community-Dwelling Elderly in Lomé (Togo) in 2017

Background. In the sub-Saharan African, region of the world with a fast growing aging population and where the use of herbal products is very common, there is a paucity of data on medication consumption patterns among elderly people. The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of polypharmacy and its associated factors among community-dwelling elderly in Lomé, Togo, in 2017. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted from March to June 2017 in Lomé, Togo among people aged 60 years and older. The Respondent Driven Sampling method was used to recruit participants. Data on socio-demographic characteristics and medication consumption patterns, including the use of medicinal plants and dietary supplements, were collected using a standardized questionnaire during a face-to-face interview at participants’ home. Descriptive and binary logistic regression analyses were performed. Results. A total of 370 participants with median age 65 years, (IQR: 62–71) were enrolled in the study. Almost three elderly in five (57.6%) were multimorbid (had two or more chronic diseases). Conventional drugs (78.4%), medicinal plants (14.3%) and other dietary supplements (9.5%) were used by participants. The prevalence of polypharmacy was 22.7% (95% CI: 18.5–27.3%). Concurrent use of conventional drugs and medicinal plants or other dietary supplements was observed among 17.0% of participants and 67.3% reported self-medication. Multimorbidity (aOR = 4.55; 95% CI: [2.42–8.54]) and female sex (aOR = 1.86; 95% CI: [1.00–3.47]) were associated with polypharmacy. Conclusion. One elderly in five uses five or more medications in Togo. Further studies are needed to assess drug-drug interactions and herb-drug interactions among this population.

Research Article

Assessment of the Health Status of the Oldest Olds Living on the Greek Island of Ikaria: A Population Based-Study in a Blue Zone

Objective. To describe the demographic characteristics, socio-economic status, functional status (autonomy, strength), and health status (cognitive and thymic functions, cardiovascular risk factors, and nutritional status) of the oldest olds living on the Greek island of Ikaria. We also try to explain the longevity observed in this population. Methods. A cross-sectional observational study of people aged 90 and over living in both municipalities of north-western Ikaria (Evdilos and Raches) was conducted over one year, from October 21, 2012 to October 21, 2013. The participants were interviewed (medical history), had a brief clinical examination, and underwent standardized geriatric assessments including the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15), the Mini-Mental-State Examination (MMSE), the Activities of Daily Living (ADL), the Instrumental ADL (IADL), and an assessment of grip strength. Results. Seventy-one persons (37 females, 34 males), aged 94.1 years on average, were interviewed at their homes. Seven percent were current smokers (females 5.4%, males 8.8%). Hypertension was diagnosed in 70.4% of participants, diabetes in 19.7%, hypercholesterolemia in 12.7%, and obesity in 17.2%; 66.0% of the population had one chronic disease or more. The mean score for the GDS-15 scale was 3.7/15.0, 23.7/30.0 for the MMSE, 4.0/6.0 for the ADL, and 4.2/8.0 in females and 3.6/5.0 in males for the IADL. Grip strength was 17.0 kg in females and 26.5 kg in males. Conclusions. This study provides an overview of the socio-demographic and medical characteristics of the oldest olds living in a longevity Blue Zone.

Research Article

Impacts of Denture Retention and Stability on Oral Health-Related Quality of Life, General Health, and Happiness in Elderly Thais

Purpose. This study investigated denture and patient related factors associated with oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) of complete denture wearers and their association with general health and happiness. Methods. This retrospective cohort study comprised 130 participants with complete edentulism, with maxillary and mandibular complete dentures treated at Chulalongkorn University Dental School during 2010-2017. The primary outcome was the presence of overall and domain-specific Oral Impacts on Daily Performances (OIDP). Secondary outcomes were diagnosed and perceived general health, and happiness. Denture retention and stability were classified as acceptable or unacceptable following the CU-modified Kapur criteria. Five esthetic-assessment criteria of the harmonization and proportions between facial and dental anatomical landmarks were measured from patient’s photographs. Age, sex, previous complete denture experience, and denture age were recorded. The associations between each variable and oral impacts were analyzed using bivariate logistic regression, and the factors with p < 0.25 were further adjusted using multivariable analysis. Associations between oral impact scores and general health and happiness were assessed using Spearman’s rank correlation. Results. The most frequent oral impacts were on physical domain, while social domain was the least affected. Denture retention/stability was significantly associated with both overall and specific domains of oral impact. Happiness was found to be strongly correlated with perceived general health, but marginally with oral impact scores. Conclusions. Unacceptable complete denture retention and stability are substantial risk factors for impaired OHRQoL in complete edentulism. Maintaining optimal denture retention and stability in denture wearers is essential for good oral health and well-being with the goal of enhancing happiness.

Research Article

Diagnostic Performance of Glymphatic System Evaluation Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus and Mimickers

Purpose. To investigate the pathological change of the glymphatic system in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) analysis. Materials and Methods. 24 right-handed patients were referred to our hydrocephalus clinic for assessment of ventriculomegaly and gait impairment. 12 of 24 were diagnosed as pseudo-iNPH (piNPH) based on assessment by a neurologist. Diffusivity maps in the direction of the x-axis (right-to-left) (Dx), y-axis (anterior-to-posterior) (Dy), and z-axis (inferior-to-superior) (Dz) were computed. The diffusion map was coregistered to International Consortium for Brain Mapping (ICBM) DTI-81 atlas. The analysis along the perivascular space (ALPS) index was defined as mean (Dxpro, Dypro)/mean (Dypro, Dzasc), where Dxpro and Dxasc are Dx values in the projection and association fiber areas, respectively. Evans index and callosal angle were also assessed on each case. Results. ALPS indexes of the control, piNPH, and iNPH cases were 1.18 ± 0.08, 1.08 ± 0.03, and 0.94 ± 0.06, respectively, and there were significant differences among the groups (control vs. piNPH, P = 0.003; control vs. iNPH P < 0.001; piNPH vs. iNPH, P < 0.001). Area under curve (AUC) was 0.92, 1.00, and 1.00 on control vs. piNPH, control vs. iNPH, and piNPH vs. iNPH on ROC analysis. Between piNPH and NPH, ALPS index has higher diagnostic performance than Evans index and callosal angle (AUC = 1.00 vs. 0.84, P = 0.028; AUC = 1.00 vs. 0.74, P = 0.016). Conclusion. Atlas-based ALPS index using the DTI method differentiated among iNPH, piNPH, and controls clearly.

Research Article

Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors of Falls among Rural Community-Dwelling Older People: A Cross-Sectional Study from Southern Sri Lanka

Falls may cause devastating consequences in older people. Conducting surveys on falls and factors associated with falls will inform better preventive health practices among older people to improve their quality of life. This study aimed to assess the prevalence and associated risk factors of falls and recurrent falls among rural community-dwelling older people in Southern Sri Lanka. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Nagoda Divisional Secretariat area, Galle, with 300 participants (females=175) aged 65 years and above. An interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect the data. To assess the prevalence of falls, participants were asked if they had fallen in the past year, and if so how many times. If any individual reported two or more falls, it was considered a recurrent fall. Biological, behavioral, environmental, and socioeconomic factors were documented as potential risk factors for falls. Multivariate logistic regression was performed with adjusted Odds Ratio (OR). Mean (SD) age was 73 (6.7) years. The prevalence of falls and recurrent falls were reported as 34.3% (95%CI; 29.03-40.04) (n=103) and 9.6% (95%CI; 6.68-13.73) (n=29), respectively. Out of 103 fallers, 37 (35.9%) had sustained injuries, with 40.5% affecting the wrist and 24.3% the hip. The associated factors for falls were age (OR=0.1), gender (OR=3.0), diabetes mellitus (OR=2.7), balance or gait problems (OR=4.2), use of antihypertensive medication (OR=0.2), and use of at least one long-term medication (OR=3.5). Associated factors for recurrent falls were age (OR=0.3), hypertension (OR=3.7), balance or gait problems (OR=3.8), sleep disturbances (OR=2.0), use of antihypertensive medication (OR=0.1), and use of at least one long-term medication (OR=3.4). A high prevalence of falls and low prevalence of recurrent falls among older people were observed. Biological and behavioral factors were reported as associated risk factors. This information is important to inform strategies to prevent falls in older people in Sri Lanka.

Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate-
Submission to final decision142 days
Acceptance to publication72 days
CiteScore1.640
Impact Factor-
 Submit