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Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research
Volume 2008 (2008), Article ID 474868, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/474868
Review Article

Thyroid Function and Cognition during Aging

1Research Center on Aging, Health and Social Services Centre, Sherbrooke Geriatrics University Institute, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada J1H 4C4
2Endocrinology Service, Department of Medicine, Sherbrooke University, 3001 12th Avenue North, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada J1H 5N4
3Department of Psychology, Sherbrooke University, 2500 University Boulevard, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada J1K 2R1

Received 5 February 2008; Accepted 20 June 2008

Academic Editor: Katsuiku Hirokawa

Copyright © 2008 M. E. Bégin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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