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Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research
Volume 2017, Article ID 4218756, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4218756
Research Article

Identification of Neuroprotective Factors Associated with Successful Ageing and Risk of Cognitive Impairment among Malaysia Older Adults

1Biomedical Science Programme, School of Diagnostic and Applied Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
2Dietetics Programme, School of Healthcare Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Correspondence should be addressed to Arimi Fitri Mat Ludin; ym.ude.mku@irtifimira

Received 31 May 2017; Revised 3 August 2017; Accepted 23 August 2017; Published 3 October 2017

Academic Editor: Marco Malavolta

Copyright © 2017 Huijin Lau et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The increase of ageing population has raised public attention on the concept of successful ageing. Studies have shown that vitamin D, telomere length, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) have been associated with cognitive function. Therefore, this study aimed to identify neuroprotective factors for cognitive decline in different ageing groups. A total of 300 older adults aged 60 years and above were recruited in this population based cross-sectional study. Participants were categorized into three groups: mild cognitive impairment (MCI) (), usual ageing (UA) (), and successful ageing (SA) (). Dietary vitamin D intake was assessed through Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ). Out of the 300 participants, only 150 were subjected to fasting blood sample collection. These samples were used for serum vitamin D and plasma BDNF measurements. Whole blood telomere length was measured using RT-PCR method. The results show that the reduction of the risk of MCI was achieved by higher serum vitamin D level (OR: 0.96, 95% CI: 0.92–0.99, ), higher plasma BDNF level (OR: 0.51, 95% CI: 0.30–0.88,  ), and longer telomere (OR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.95–0.99,  ). In conclusion, participants with higher vitamin D level, higher BDNF level, and longer telomere length were more likely to age successfully.