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Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research
Volume 2017, Article ID 9417350, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9417350
Research Article

Associations of Pet Ownership with Older Adults Eating Patterns and Health

Department of Human Environmental Studies, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Roschelle Heuberger; ude.hcimc@ar1ebueh

Received 6 February 2017; Revised 26 March 2017; Accepted 4 April 2017; Published 29 May 2017

Academic Editor: Fulvio Lauretani

Copyright © 2017 Roschelle Heuberger. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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