Table of Contents
Chemotherapy Research and Practice
Volume 2011, Article ID 715469, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/715469
Research Article

The Role of Wild-Type p53 in Cisplatin-Induced Chk2 Phosphorylation and the Inhibition of Platinum Resistance with a Chk2 Inhibitor

1Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, and Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA
2Molecular Pharmacology Section, Medical Oncology Branch and Affiliates, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
3Experimental Therapeutics Section, Medical Oncology Branch and Affiliates, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA

Received 26 August 2010; Accepted 25 October 2010

Academic Editor: Athanassios Tsakris

Copyright © 2011 Xiaobing Liang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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