Table of Contents
Chemotherapy Research and Practice
Volume 2011, Article ID 878912, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/878912
Review Article

New Agents Targeting Angiogenesis in Glioblastoma

Department of Medical Oncology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki School of Medicine and General Hospital “Papageorgiou”, 54303 Thessaloniki, Greece

Received 30 April 2011; Revised 22 July 2011; Accepted 23 August 2011

Academic Editor: Andreas F. Hottinger

Copyright © 2011 Eleni Timotheadou. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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