Table of Contents
Chemotherapy Research and Practice
Volume 2013, Article ID 614670, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/614670
Research Article

Identification of Functional Regulatory Residues of the β-Lactam Inducible Penicillin Binding Protein in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

Received 27 April 2013; Revised 19 June 2013; Accepted 3 July 2013

Academic Editor: Spyros Pournaras

Copyright © 2013 Andreas N. Mbah and Raphael D. Isokpehi. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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