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Computational Intelligence and Neuroscience
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 4296356, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4296356
Research Article

A Cognitive Model Based on Neuromodulated Plasticity

1Institute of Artificial Intelligence and Robotics, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124, China
2Pilot College, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 101101, China

Received 6 March 2016; Revised 17 July 2016; Accepted 22 September 2016

Academic Editor: Leonardo Franco

Copyright © 2016 Jing Huang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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