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Computational Intelligence and Neuroscience
Volume 2017, Article ID 6076913, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6076913
Review Article

Enrichment of Human-Computer Interaction in Brain-Computer Interfaces via Virtual Environments

Escuela de Ingeniería y Ciencias, Tecnológico de Monterrey, Eugenio Garza Sada 2501, 64849 Monterrey, NL, Mexico

Correspondence should be addressed to Alonso-Valerdi Luz María; xm.mseti@lavola.ml

Received 23 June 2017; Revised 1 November 2017; Accepted 12 November 2017; Published 29 November 2017

Academic Editor: Fabio Solari

Copyright © 2017 Alonso-Valerdi Luz María and Mercado-García Víctor Rodrigo. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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