Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology

Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology / 1995 / Article

Career Choices | Open Access

Volume 9 |Article ID 543750 | https://doi.org/10.1155/1995/543750

Paul C Adams, Iain Murray, Gordon Bierbrier, "Distribution and Career Choices of Canadian Trainees in Gastroenterology", Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, vol. 9, Article ID 543750, 3 pages, 1995. https://doi.org/10.1155/1995/543750

Distribution and Career Choices of Canadian Trainees in Gastroenterology

Received28 Jul 1994
Accepted11 Oct 1994

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To study the career choices, academic productivity and geographical distribution of trainees in gastroenterology from Canadian training programs from 1984-91.METHODS: The names and current locations of trainees in gastroenterology were requested from program directors. Data were obtained from CD-ROM on the publications of the trainees during their fellowship. Migration patterns and trends were analyzed over the study period.RESULTS: Data were obtained on 170 trainees. Forty-one per cent of trainees were working in a hospital affiliated with a university medical centre. Most Canadian trainees continue to practise gastroenterology in the province in which they trained. Trainees who pursued an academic career had an average of 1.1 peer-reviewed publication compared with community-based gastroenterologists who averaged 0.40 publications during their fellowship (P=0.02).CONCLUSIONS: Many Canadian gastroenterology trainees continue to be affiliated with an academic medical centre. Those trainees who published during their fellowship were associated with a career at an academic centre. Migration to other provinces or countries is uncommon and did not significantly change over the study period.

Copyright © 1995 Canadian Association of Gastroenterology. This open-access article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (CC BY-NC) (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits reuse, distribution, and reproduction of the article, provided that the original work is properly cited and the reuse is restricted to noncommercial purposes.


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