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Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume 22 (2008), Issue 7, Pages 634-636
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/780204
Brief Communication

Colonic Interposition in a Woman with Attenuated Familial Adenomatous Polyposis: Does the Location of the Colon Affect Polyp Formation?

Melanie D Beaton,1 Brian Taylor,2 David Driman,3 Peter Ainsworth,4 and Paul C Adams1

1Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Molecular Diagnostics Laboratory, London Health Sciences Centre, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada
2Department of Surgery, Division of General Surgery, Molecular Diagnostics Laboratory, London Health Sciences Centre, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada
3Department of Pathology, Molecular Diagnostics Laboratory, London Health Sciences Centre, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada
4Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Diagnostics Laboratory, London Health Sciences Centre, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada

Received 18 January 2008; Accepted 5 March 2008

Copyright © 2008 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis (AFAP) is a rare but well-established cause of colorectal carcinoma and multiple polyps. The present paper describes a case of a woman diagnosed with colorectal cancer at 34 years of age and subsequently found to have AFAP by genetic testing. During infancy, the patient underwent surgical correction of esophageal atresia with colonic interposition. While she had developed adenomatous polyps in her native cecum, there was no evidence of polyps or cancer in the segment of large intestine interposed between her upper esophagus and stomach. Therefore, various environmental differences between the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract may play a role in the expression of AFAP phenotype.