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Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume 24 (2010), Issue 5, Pages 312-316
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/902847
Original Article

Endoscopic Assessment of Children with Esophageal Atresia: Lack of Relationship of Esophagitis and Esophageal Metaplasia to Symptomatology

Julie Castilloux,1,3 Dorothée Bouron-Dal Soglio,2,4 and Christophe Faure1,4

1Division of Gastroenterology and Department of Pediatrics, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Laval, Laval, Canada
2Department of Pathology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Laval, Laval, Canada
3Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Laval, Laval, Canada
4Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Sainte-Justine, Montréal, Québec, Canada

Received 22 May 2009; Accepted 4 September 2009

Copyright © 2010 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Late complications of esophageal atresia (EA), particularly esophagitis and Barrett’s esophagus, are increasingly being recognized. With the exception of patients with dysphagia associated with esophageal stricture, it is unknown whether patient symptomatology can predict endoscopic findings.

METHODS: Data regarding the digestive symptoms of patients who were referred to the EA multidisciplinary clinic from October 2005 to October 2008, and underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopic evaluation, were systematically collected. Macroscopic and histological findings were analyzed. Endoscopy was considered normal if no esophagitis, intestinal metaplasia or gastric metaplasia (GM) was discerned.

RESULTS: Sixty-three patients underwent endoscopy. Eighteen had dysphagia related to an esophageal stricture needing dilation and were subsequently excluded from the analysis. Forty-five patients (26 girls) with a median age of 7.3 years (range 0.4 to 17.9 years) were evaluated. Twenty-six patients (58%) were normal at endoscopy, 14 patients (31%) had esophagitis and 16 patients (36%) had GM. No intestinal metaplasia or adenocarcinoma was detected. Six patients with abnormal endoscopy results were asymptomatic. No correlation between digestive symptoms and endoscopy results was found.

CONCLUSION: The present cross-sectional study showed that symptomatology was not predictive of abnormal endoscopy in EA patients. Esophagitis or GM may be discovered, even in the absence of symptoms, suggesting that physicians cannot rely solely on symptomatology to accurately evaluate the extent of these esophageal complications in this population.