Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology

Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology / 2012 / Article

Original Article | Open Access

Volume 26 |Article ID 951071 | https://doi.org/10.1155/2012/951071

Karuppan Chetty Muthiah, Robert Enns, David Armstrong, Angela Noble, James Gray, Paul Sinclair, Palma Colacino, Harminder Singh, "A Survey of the Practice of After-Hours and Emergency Endoscopy in Canada", Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, vol. 26, Article ID 951071, 6 pages, 2012. https://doi.org/10.1155/2012/951071

A Survey of the Practice of After-Hours and Emergency Endoscopy in Canada

Received28 May 2012
Accepted04 Jun 2012

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine staffing and practice patterns for after-hours endoscopy service in CanadaMETHODS: A link to a web-based survey was sent by e-mail to all clinical members of the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology in February 2011. A priori, it was planned to compare variations in practice among gastroenterologists (GIs) performing endoscopy in different regions of Canada, between pediatric and adult GIs, and between university and community hospitals.RESULTS: Of 422 potential respondents, 168 (40%) responded. Of the 139 adult GIs, 61% performed after-hours endoscopy in the endoscopy suite where daytime procedures were performed, 62% had a trained endoscopy nurse available for all procedures, 38% had access to propofol sedation, 12% reprocessed the endoscopes themselves or with the help of a resident, 4% had out-of-hospital patients come directly to their endoscopy suite and 53% were highly satisfied. The adult endoscopists practising at community hospitals were more likely to have an anesthetist attend the procedure. Regional differences were noted, with more involvement of anesthetists (13%) and availability of propofol (50%) in Ontario, more frequent reprocessing of endoscopes in the central reprocessing units in British Columbia (78%) and almost universal availability of a trained endoscopy nurse (96%) with concomitant higher endoscopist satisfaction (84% highly satisfied) in Alberta.CONCLUSIONS: More than one-third of surveyed endoscopists across the country do not have a trained endoscopy nurse to assist in after-hours endoscopy – the time period when urgent patients often present and typically require therapeutic endoscopic interventions. There are significant regional differences in the practice of after-hours endoscopy in Canada.

Copyright © 2012 Canadian Association of Gastroenterology. This open-access article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (CC BY-NC) (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits reuse, distribution, and reproduction of the article, provided that the original work is properly cited and the reuse is restricted to noncommercial purposes.


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