Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology

Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology / 2013 / Article

Original Article | Open Access

Volume 27 |Article ID 170546 | https://doi.org/10.1155/2013/170546

Alexandra Shingina, Al Moutaz Hashim, Mazhar Haque, Michael Suen, Eric M Yoshida, Sharlene Gill, Fergal Donnellan, Alan A Weiss, "In a ‘Real-World’, Clinic-Based Community Setting, Sorafenib Dose of 400 mg/day is as Effective as Standard Dose of 800 mg/day in Patients with Advanced Hepatocellular Carcimona, with Better Tolerance and Similar Survival", Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, vol. 27, Article ID 170546, 4 pages, 2013. https://doi.org/10.1155/2013/170546

In a ‘Real-World’, Clinic-Based Community Setting, Sorafenib Dose of 400 mg/day is as Effective as Standard Dose of 800 mg/day in Patients with Advanced Hepatocellular Carcimona, with Better Tolerance and Similar Survival

Received15 Nov 2012
Accepted30 Jan 2013

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Sorafenib, an oral multityrosine kinase inhibitor, has been approved for treatment of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). British Columbia (BC) was the first province in Canada to provide drug coverage for sorafenib.OBJECTIVE: To review the BC experience with sorafenib to assess its effectiveness and tolerance in a ‘real-world’ clinical setting.METHODS: A retrospective clinic chart review identified 99 patients referred to the BC Cancer Agency from 2008 to 2010 with a diagnosis of HCC who qualified for treatment with sorafenib.RESULTS: Therapy with sorafenib was initiated and continued at a reduced dosage of 400 mg/day in 66 of 99 patients, with 22 patients requiring further dose reduction. Full- and reduced-dose group patients had similar baseline characteristics, except for a higher proportion of female patients (P=0.02) and individuals with alcoholic liver disease (P=0.04) in the full-dose group. The incidence of any grade of adverse effects was higher in the full-dose group (94% versus 77% in the reduced-dose group; P=0.04). Dose reduction rates were significantly higher in the full-dose group, occurring in 66% versus 24% of reduced-dose group patients (P=0.001). The overall survival rates were similar between the two groups: 7.8 months versus 7.1 months in full- versus reduced-dose groups (P=0.14), as were radiological progression rates and alpha-fetoprotein levels.CONCLUSIONS: In a review of 99 patients in a ‘real-world’ community setting, a sorafenib dose of 400 mg/day was better tolerated and had similar efficacy compared with a sorafenib dose of 800 mg/day with respect to survival and outcomes.

Copyright © 2013 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


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