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Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Volume 2017, Article ID 9365657, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9365657
Research Article

The Geography of Primary Hepatic Neoplasms Treatments in Canada: Changes in Latitudes and Changes in Attitudes

1Department of Surgery, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada
2Surveillance and Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Care Nova Scotia, Halifax, NS, Canada
3Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Michele Molinari; ude.cmpu@miranilom

Received 24 April 2017; Revised 23 June 2017; Accepted 27 June 2017; Published 26 July 2017

Academic Editor: Tatsuo Kanda

Copyright © 2017 Matthew Cwinn et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Studies on treatment modalities for primary hepatic neoplasms (PHN) in Canada are lacking. Our primary aim was to analyze the age-standardized incidence of hepatic resection, ablation, transplantation, and embolization for PHN between 2002 and 2013. Secondary aim was to evaluate temporal trends for these treatment modalities. Study Design. National Canadian Cancer Registries were accessed for relevant epidemiological data. Age-standardized incidence of treatment ratios (SIRs) was calculated and comparisons were performed for Atlantic Canada, Ontario, the Prairies, and British Columbia. Results. British Columbia recorded the highest SIRs for ablation (1.9; 95% CI 1.8–2.0), hepatic resection (1.2; 95% CI 1.1–1.3), and transarterial locoregional therapies (2.8; 95% CI 2.4–3.2). For hepatic resection, the lowest SIR was found in Atlantic Canada (0.7; 95% CI 0.6–0.9), while the Prairies recorded the lowest estimate for transarterial therapies (0.2; 95% CI 0.1–0.4). Liver transplantation had the highest SIR in Ontario (1.5; 95% CI 1.3–1.6) and the lowest SIR in British Columbia. No significant temporal changes in SIRs were observed for any of the treatments except for transarterial therapies. Conclusions. Treatment of PHN in Canada differs by geography. Variations might be due to differences in expertise or access to therapeutic modalities.