Canadian Journal of Infectious Diseases and Medical Microbiology

Canadian Journal of Infectious Diseases and Medical Microbiology / 1993 / Article

Original Article | Open Access

Volume 4 |Article ID 495480 | https://doi.org/10.1155/1993/495480

Joan L Robinson, Alan I Hartstein, Renate U Meuser, Virginia H Morthland, Margaret E Dragoon, Wanda M Wenman, "Molecular epidemiology of Candida albicans colonization and fungemia in very low birthweight infants", Canadian Journal of Infectious Diseases and Medical Microbiology, vol. 4, Article ID 495480, 6 pages, 1993. https://doi.org/10.1155/1993/495480

Molecular epidemiology of Candida albicans colonization and fungemia in very low birthweight infants

Received27 Sep 1992
Accepted16 Dec 1992

Abstract

Objective: This study investigated the relationship between colonization and fungemia.Design: This was a prospective study involving surveillance cultures of the nares, base of umbilicus, point of entry of umbilical catheter and parenteral fluids. Blood cultures were done when sepsis was suspected. All Candida albicans isolates were typed using restriction enzyme analysis of DNA.Setting: Patients were from the neonatal intensive care unit of a tertiary care hospital.Population Studied: Twenty-nine very low birthweight infants.Main Results: Eleven babies were colonized with C albicans and five of these babies developed fungemia, including five of seven who were colonized at the point of entry of the umbilical catheter. Three different strains of C albicans caused fungemia. In four of the five patients, initial catheter entry site isolates were identical to the subsequent blood isolates. Occasionally, infants were colonized with more than one strain of C albicans.Conclusions: Preceding colonization with C albicans and, in particular, colonization at the site of entry of umbilical vascular catheters are risk factors for subsequent development of C albicans fungemia. Fungemic and colonizing isolates are usually identical to one another by DNA typing.

Copyright © 1993 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


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