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Canadian Journal of Infectious Diseases
Volume 12, Issue 6, Pages 364-370
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2001/424608
Original Article

The Emerging Epidemiology of VRE in Canada: Results of the CNISP Passive Reporting Network, 1994 to 1998

John M Conly,1 Marianna Ofner-Agostini,2 Shirley Paton,2 Lynn Johnston,3 Michael Mulvey,4 Amar Kureishi,6 Lindsay Nicolle,6 Anne Matlow,7 the Canadian Hospital Epidemiology Committee, and the Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program8

1University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
2Centre for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Population and Public Health Branch (formerly the Laboratory Centre for Disease Control), Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
3Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
4National Microbiology Laboratory, Centre for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Population and Public Health Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
5Foothills Hospital, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
6Winnipeg Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
7The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
8Centre for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Population and Public Health Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Received 18 January 2001; Accepted 12 June 2001

Copyright © 2001 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To provide a rapid and efficient means of collecting descriptive epidemiological data on occurrences of vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE) in Canada.

DESIGN AND METHODS: Passive reporting of data on individual or cluster occurrences of VRE using a one-page surveillance form.

SETTING: The surveillance form was periodically distributed to all Canadian Hospital Epidemiology Committee members, Community and Hospital Infection Control Association members, L'Association des professionnels pour la prevention des infections members and provincial laboratories, representing 650 health care facilities across Canada.

PATIENTS: Patients colonized or infected with VRE within Canadian health care facilities.

RESULTS: Until the end of 1998, 263 reports of VRE were received from 113 health care facilities in 10 provinces, comprising a total of 1315 cases of VRE, with 1246 cases colonized (94.7%), 61 infected (4.6%)and eight of unknown status. (0.6%). VRE occurrences were reported in 56% of acute care teaching facilities and 38% of acute care community facilities. All facilities of more than 800 beds reported VRE occurences compared with only 10% of facilities with less than 200 beds (r2=0.86). Medical and surgical wards accounted for 51.4% of the reported VRE occurences. Sixty-five (24.7%) reports indicated an index case was from a foreign country, with 85.2% from the United States and 14.8% from other countries. Some type of screening was conducted in 50% of the sites.

CONCLUSIONS: A VRE passive reporting network provided a rapid and efficient means of providing data on the evolving epidemiology of VRE in Canada.