Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Canadian Journal of Infectious Diseases and Medical Microbiology
Volume 22, Issue 1, Pages 19-24
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/745090
Original Article

Evaluation of the Do Bugs Need Drugs? Program in British Columbia: Can We Curb Antibiotic Prescribing?

Rachel M. McKay,1 Linda Vrbova,2 Elaine Fuertes,2 Mei Chong,1 Samara David,1 Kim Dreher,1 Dale Purych,3,4 Edith Blondel-Hill,2,5 Bonnie Henry,1,2 Fawziah Marra,1,2 Perry RW. Kendall,6 and David M. Patrick1,2

1BC Centre for Disease Control, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
2University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
3BC Biomedical Laboratories Ltd, Canada
4Fraser Health Authority, Surrey, Canada
5Interior Health Authority, Kelowna, Canada
6British Columbia Ministry of Health, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

Copyright © 2011 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Antibiotic resistance is accelerated by the overuse of antibiotics. Do Bugs Need Drugs? is an educational program adapted in British Columbia to target both the public and health care professionals, with the aim of reducing unnecessary prescribing. The current article presents a descriptive evaluation of the impact of the program over the first four years.

METHOD: Program implementation was measured by the amount of educational material distributed and the level of participation in educational sessions. The impact of the program was assessed by measuring changes in knowledge and prescribing habits of participating physicians, and by investigating provincial trends in antibiotic use.

METHOD: Program implementation was measured by the amount of educational material distributed and the level of participation in educational sessions. The impact of the program was assessed by measuring changes in knowledge and prescribing habits of participating physicians, and by investigating provincial trends in antibiotic use.

RESULTS: A total of 51,367 children, assisted-living residents and health care professionals have participated in the program since its inception in the fall of 2005. Pre- and postcourse assessments of participating physicians indicated significant improvements in clinical knowledge and appropriate antibiotic treatment of upper respiratory tract infections. Overall rates of antibiotic use in the province have stabilized since 2006. The rates of consumption of fluoroquinolones and macrolides have levelled off since 2005. Utilization rates for acute bronchitis are at the same level as when the program was first implemented, but rates for other acute upper respiratory tract infections of interest have declined.

CONCLUSIONS: The Do Bugs Need Drugs? program significantly improves physician antibiotic prescription decisions and is ecologically associated with desirable change in population antibiotic consumption patterns.