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Canadian Journal of Infectious Diseases and Medical Microbiology
Volume 2016, Article ID 1742530, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1742530
Research Article

Measles Outbreak among Previously Immunized Adult Healthcare Workers, China, 2015

1Department of General Medicine, Lanzhou University Second Hospital, Gansu 730030, China
2Department of Public Health, Lanzhou University Second Hospital, Gansu 730030, China
3Department of Cardiology, Lanzhou University Second Hospital, Gansu 730030, China

Received 22 January 2016; Revised 15 March 2016; Accepted 27 March 2016

Academic Editor: Mark A. Wainberg

Copyright © 2016 Zhengyi Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Measles is caused by measles virus belonging to genus Morbillivirus of the family Paramyxoviridae. Vaccination has played a critical role in controlling measles infection worldwide. However, in the recent years, outbreaks of measles infection still occur in many developing countries. Here, we report an outbreak of measles among healthcare workers and among the 60 measles infected patients 50 were healthcare workers including doctors, nurses, staff, and medics. Fifty-one patients (85%) tested positive for IgM antibodies against the measles virus and 50 patients (83.3%) tested positive for measles virus RNA. Surprisingly, 73.3% of the infected individuals had been previously immunized against measles. Since there is no infection division in our hospital, the fever clinics are located in the Emergency Division. In addition, the fever and rash were not recognized as measles symptoms at the beginning of the outbreak. These factors result in delay in isolation and early confirmation of the suspected patients and eventually a measles outbreak in the hospital. Our report highlights the importance of following a two-dose measles vaccine program in people including the healthcare workers. In addition, vigilant attention should be paid to medical staff with clinical fever and rash symptoms to avoid a possible nosocomial transmission of measles infection.