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Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging
Volume 2017, Article ID 1323802, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1323802
Research Article

Analytical Interference by Contrast Agents in Biochemical Assays

1Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
2Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev, Herlev, Denmark
3Department of Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev, Herlev, Denmark

Correspondence should be addressed to Henrik S. Thomsen; kd.hnoiger@nesmoht.kirneh

Received 5 January 2017; Accepted 30 March 2017; Published 10 April 2017

Academic Editor: Giuseppe Rubini

Copyright © 2017 Sigrid Otnes et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. To provide a clinically relevant overview of the analytical interference by contrast agents (CA) in laboratory blood test measurements. Materials and Methods. The effects of five CAs, gadobutrol, gadoterate meglumine, gadoxetate disodium, iodixanol, and iomeprol, were studied on the 29 most frequently performed biochemical assays. One-day-old plasma, serum, and whole blood were spiked with doses of each agent such that the gadolinium agents and the iodine agents reached concentrations of 0.5 mM and 12 mg iodine/mL, respectively. Subsequently, 12 assays were reexamined using and of these CA concentrations. The results were assessed statistically by a paired Student’s -test. Results. Iodixanol produced a negative interference on the bicarbonate (), lactate dehydrogenase (), and zinc () assays and a positive interference on the albumin (), calcium (), ionized calcium (), iron (), and potassium () assays. Iomeprol produced a negative interference on the bicarbonate () and magnesium () assays and a positive interference on the calcium () and potassium () assays. Gadoxetate disodium produced a negative interference on the iron () and zinc () assays and a positive interference on the sodium () assay. Conclusion. CAs cause analytical interference. Attention should be given to the above-mentioned analyte-CA combinations when assessing laboratory blood test results obtained after CA administration.