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Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging
Volume 2017, Article ID 5418495, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5418495
Research Article

The Optimal Timing for Pancreatic Islet Transplantation into Subcutaneous Scaffolds Assessed by Multimodal Imaging

1MR Unit, Department of Radiodiagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic
2Institute of Biophysics and Informatics, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic
3Centre of Experimental Medicine, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic
4Department of Clinical and Transplant Pathology, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic
5Department of Pathology, Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic
6Diabetes Centre, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic

Correspondence should be addressed to Daniel Jirák; zc.meki@ijad

Received 15 September 2017; Revised 16 November 2017; Accepted 22 November 2017; Published 26 December 2017

Academic Editor: Anne Roivainen

Copyright © 2017 Andrea Gálisová et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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