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Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging
Volume 2018 (2018), Article ID 1269830, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/1269830
Research Article

Preclinical In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of [18F]FE@SUPPY for Cancer PET Imaging: Limitations of a Xenograft Model for Colorectal Cancer

1Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
2Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
3Institute of Pathophysiology and Allergy Research, Center of Pathophysiology, Infectiology and Immunology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
4Department of Internal Medicine II, University Hospital Krems, Karl Landsteiner University of Health Sciences, Krems an der Donau, Austria
5Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Medical Physics, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
6Comparative Medicine, The Interuniversity Messerli Research Institute, The University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Medical University of Vienna, and University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
7Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
8Department of Surgery, Surgical Research Laboratories, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
9Institute of Organic Chemistry, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
10Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
11CBmed GmbH, Graz, Austria
12Ludwig Boltzmann Institute Applied Diagnostics, Vienna, Austria

Correspondence should be addressed to M. Mitterhauser; ta.ca.neiwinudem@resuahrettim.sukram

Received 23 November 2017; Accepted 27 December 2017; Published 13 February 2018

Academic Editor: Giorgio Biasiotto

Copyright © 2018 T. Balber et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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