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Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 790721, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/790721
Research Article

Quantitative Model for Efficient Temporal Targeting of Tumor Cells and Neovasculature

1Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1
2Center for Mathematical Medicine, Fields Institute for Research in Mathematical Sciences, Toronto, ON, Canada M5T 3J1
3Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
4Department of Applied Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
5Department of Medicine, BWH-HST Center for Biomedical Engineering, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA

Received 13 July 2010; Accepted 9 January 2011

Academic Editor: Nestor V. Torres

Copyright © 2011 M. Kohandel et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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