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Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine
Volume 2012, Article ID 138401, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/138401
Research Article

Simulation of Exercise-Induced Syncope in a Heart Model with Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

1Department of Hematology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, 1104 Ljubljana, Slovenia
2Institute of Pathophysiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, 1104 Ljubljana, Slovenia

Received 22 June 2012; Revised 8 October 2012; Accepted 15 October 2012

Academic Editor: Gangmin Ning

Copyright © 2012 Matjaž Sever et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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