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Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine
Volume 2012, Article ID 138757, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/138757
Research Article

An Epidemiological Model of Rift Valley Fever with Spatial Dynamics

1Division of Integrated Biodefense, ISIS Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC 20007, USA
2Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-2220, USA
3Department of Biological Sciences, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529, USA
4Virginia Modeling Analysis & Simulation Center, Old Dominion University, Suffolk, VA 23435, USA
5Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC 20007, USA

Received 26 January 2012; Revised 30 May 2012; Accepted 5 June 2012

Academic Editor: Gary C. An

Copyright © 2012 Tianchan Niu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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