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Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 864979, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/864979
Research Article

Altered Intrinsic Connectivity Networks in Frontal Lobe Epilepsy: A Resting-State fMRI Study

1Department of Biomedical Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016, China
2Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002, China
3Department of Radiotherapy, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002, China

Received 21 July 2014; Revised 12 October 2014; Accepted 2 November 2014; Published 26 November 2014

Academic Editor: Valeri Makarov

Copyright © 2014 Xinzhi Cao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Examining the resting-state networks (RSNs) may help us to understand the neural mechanism of the frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE). Resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) data were acquired from 46 patients with FLE (study group) and 46 age- and gender-matched healthy subjects (control group). The independent component analysis (ICA) method was used to identify RSNs from each group. Compared with the healthy subjects, decreased functional connectivity was observed in all the networks; however, in some areas of RSNs, functional connectivity was increased in patients with FLE. The duration of epilepsy and the seizure frequency were used to analyze correlation with the regions of interest (ROIs) in the nine RSNs to determine their influence on FLE. The functional network connectivity (FNC) was used to study the impact on the disturbance and reorganization of FLE. The results of this study may offer new insight into the neuropathophysiological mechanisms of FLE.