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Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 476050, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/476050
Research Article

Simulation on the Comparison of Steady-State Responses Synthesized by Transient Templates Based on Superposition Hypothesis

School of Biomedical Engineering, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510515, China

Received 1 August 2015; Revised 1 October 2015; Accepted 13 October 2015

Academic Editor: Anne Humeau-Heurtier

Copyright © 2015 Xiao-dan Tan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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