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Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine
Volume 2017, Article ID 3927486, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3927486
Research Article

Noise Attenuation Estimation for Maximum Length Sequences in Deconvolution Process of Auditory Evoked Potentials

1School of Biomedical Engineering, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China
2Stephenson School of Biomedical Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Xiaodan Tan; nc.ude.ums@yzldxt

Received 15 December 2016; Revised 19 January 2017; Accepted 26 January 2017; Published 19 February 2017

Academic Editor: Anne Humeau-Heurtier

Copyright © 2017 Xian Peng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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