Concepts in Magnetic Resonance Part B, Magnetic Resonance Engineering
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Electromagnetic Simulation of Signal Distribution of Various RF Endoluminal Loop Geometries with Coil Orientation: Towards a Reconfigurable Design

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Concepts in Magnetic Resonance Part B publishes research concerning the design and development of hardware and software employed in magnetic resonance techniques, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR).

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Concepts in Magnetic Resonance Part B maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors expert and up-to-date in the field of study.

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Research Article

Novel Method to Improve the Uniformity of 7T Body MR Images

When using ultrahigh-field MR systems (7T), the variations in the RF magnetic field can lead to significant loss in image uniformity. To optimize the overall MR image quality, the image region is divided into multiple smaller regions of interest (the ROIs), which can be independently optimized using transmit array optimization techniques including RF shimming, to improve RF magnetic fields and image intensity. Electromagnetic numerical simulations and corresponding transverse magnetization (|Mt|) acquired using the Bloch equation-based MRI simulator are used to evaluate the proposed method. Compared to the simulation results of quadrature driving method, mean and standard deviation (SD) of |Mt| in the full image (an inner diameter of 500 mm) were improved 47% (mean) and 48% (SD), whereas 94% (max) and 97% (mean) improved in the unaveraged SAR using the proposed method. The uniformity of |Mt| acquired using the method was especially improved in the peripheral region of the selected phantom image compared to that of other methods. The proposed method using multiple independently optimized ROIs and numerical simulations significantly improved the uniformity of |Mt| body images at 7T. This technique would be generally applicable to any high-field strength MR systems, which generate short RF wavelengths compared to the field of view.

Research Article

Quasistatic Solutions versus Full-Wave Solutions of Single-Channel Circular RF Receive Coils on Phantoms of Varying Conductivities at 3 Tesla

Purpose. Although full-wave simulations could be used to aid in RF coil design, the algorithms may be too slow for an iterative optimization algorithm. If quasistatic simulations are accurate within the design tolerance, then their use could reduce simulation time by orders of magnitude compared to full-wave simulations. This paper examines the accuracy of quasistatic and full-wave simulations at 3 Tesla. Methods. Three sets of eight coils ranging from 3–10 cm (24 total) were used to measure SNR on three phantoms with conductivities of 0.3, 0.6, and 0.9 S/m. The phantom conductivities were chosen to represent those typically found in human tissues. The range of coil element sizes represents the sizes of coil elements seen in typical coil designs. SNR was determined using the magnetic and electric fields calculated by quasistatic and full-wave simulations. Each simulated SNR dataset was scaled to minimize the root mean squared error (RMSE) when compared against measured SNR data. In addition, the noise values calculated by each simulation were compared against benchtop measured noise values. Results. The RMSE was 0.285 and 0.087 for the quasistatic and full-wave simulations, respectively. The maximum and minimum quotient values, when taking the ratio of simulated to measured SNR values, were 1.69 and 0.20 for the quasistatic simulations and 1.29 and 0.75 for the full-wave simulations, respectively. The ratio ranges, for the calculated quasistatic and full-wave total noise values compared to benchtop measured noise values, were 0.83–1.06 and 0.27–3.02, respectively. Conclusions. Full-wave simulations were on average 3x more accurate than the quasistatic simulations. Full-wave simulations were more accurate in characterizing the wave effects within the sample, though they were not able to fully account for the skin effect when calculating coil noise.

Research Article

Capacitive versus Overlap Decoupling of Adjacent Radio Frequency Phased Array Coil Elements: An Imaging Robustness Comparison When Sample Load Varies for 3 Tesla MRI

Phased array (PA) receive coils are built such that coil elements approximate independent antenna behavior. One method of achieving this goal is to use an available decoupling method to decouple adjacent coil elements. The purpose of this work was to compare the relative performance of two decoupling methods as a function of variation in sample load. Two PA receive coils with 5 channels (5-ch) each, equal outer dimensions, and formed on 12 cm diameter cylindrical phantoms of conductivities 0.3, 0.6, and 0.9 S/m were evaluated for relative signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and parallel imaging performance. They were only tuned and matched to the 0.6 S/m phantom. Simulated and measured axial, sagittal, and coronal 5-ch PA coil SNR ratios were compared by dividing the overlap by the capacitive decoupled coil SNR results. Issues related to the selection of capacitor values for the two decoupling methods were evaluated by taking the ratio of the match and tune capacitors for large and small 2 channel (2-ch) PA coils. The SNR ratios showed that the SNR of the two decoupling methods were very similar. The inverse geometry-factor maps showed similar but better overall parallel imaging performance for the capacitive decoupled method. The quotients for the 2-ch PA coils’ maximum and minimum capacitor value ratios are 3.28 and 1.38 for the large and 3.28 and 2.22 for the small PA. The results of this paper demonstrate that as the sample load varies, the capacitive and overlap decoupling methods are very similar in relative SNR and this similarity continues for parallel imaging performance. Although, for the 5-ch coils studied, the capacitive decoupling method has a slight SNR and parallel imaging advantage and it was noted that the capacitive decoupled coil is more likely to encounter unbuildable PA coil configurations.

Research Article

SQUID-Based Magnetic Resonance Imaging at Ultra-Low Field Using the Backprojection Method

Ultra-low field magnetic resonance imaging (ULF MRI) is an effective imaging technique that applies the ultrasensitive detector of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensor to detect the MR signal at a microtesla field range. In this work, we designed and developed a SQUID-based ULF MRI system with a frequency-adjustable measurement field, the performance of which was characterized via water phantoms. In order to enhance the MR signals, a 500 mT Halbach magnet was used to prepolarize the magnetization of the sample prior to excitation. The signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) of the spin-echo- (SE-) based pulse sequence can reach up to 70 in a single scan. The images were then reconstructed successfully by using the maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) algorithm based on the backprojection imaging method. It was demonstrated that an in-plane resolution of 1.8 × 1.8 mm2 can be achieved which indicated the feasibility of SQUID-based MRI at the ULF.

Research Article

The “Loopole” Antenna: A Hybrid Coil Combining Loop and Electric Dipole Properties for Ultra-High-Field MRI

Purpose. To revisit the “loopole,” an unusual coil topology whose unbalanced current distribution captures both loop and electric dipole properties, which can be advantageous in ultra-high-field MRI. Methods. Loopole coils were built by deliberately breaking the capacitor symmetry of traditional loop coils. The corresponding current distribution, transmit efficiency, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were evaluated in simulation and experiments in comparison to those of loops and electric dipoles at 7 T (297 MHz). Results. The loopole coil exhibited a hybrid current pattern, comprising features of both loops and electric dipole current patterns. Depending on the orientation relative to B0, the loopole demonstrated significant performance boost in either the transmit efficiency or SNR at the center of a dielectric sample when compared to a traditional loop. Modest improvements were observed when compared to an electric dipole. Conclusion. The loopole can achieve high performance by supporting both divergence-free and curl-free current patterns, which are both significant contributors to the ultimate intrinsic performance at ultra-high field. While electric dipoles exhibit similar hybrid properties, loopoles maintain the engineering advantages of loops, such as geometric decoupling and reduced resonance frequency dependence on sample loading.

Review Article

Thermal Effects Associated with RF Exposures in Diagnostic MRI: Overview of Existing and Emerging Concepts of Protection

Apart from magnetic attraction risks, the primary biophysical concern associated with MRI is radiofrequency heating of the human body and associated discomfort, health deterioration, or potential burns. This paper reviews experimental data and numerical modeling of systemic (core and brain) temperature and local thermal effects associated with diagnostic MRI exposures at 1.5T (64 MHz) and 3.0T (128 MHz). Allowable temperatures and duration of systemic exposure are established based on knowledge of (short-term) human thermobiology. Longer term effects related to DNA damage or altered cellular pathways are not covered in this review. Updated limits are proposed for core temperature increase (≤1.3°C) and for Specific Absorption (<4 kJ/kg). The potential use of thermal dose (CEM43) for local thermal protection is described, and previously proposed exposure limit values are evaluated against available data from current MRI practice. Gaps in knowledge are identified, and recommendations for additional research are provided.

Concepts in Magnetic Resonance Part B, Magnetic Resonance Engineering
Publishing Collaboration
More info
Wiley Hindawi logo
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate-
Submission to final decision-
Acceptance to publication-
CiteScore0.780
Journal Citation Indicator0.230
Impact Factor1.176
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