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Complexity
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 9514369, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9514369
Research Article

A Resting-State Brain Functional Network Study in MDD Based on Minimum Spanning Tree Analysis and the Hierarchical Clustering

1School of Information Science & Engineering, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China
2International WIC Institute, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing, China
3The Third People’s Hospital of Tianshui City, Tianshui, China
4Lanzhou University Second Hospital, Lanzhou, China
5Beijing Anding Hospital of Capital Medical University, Beijing, China
6Computer Systems Institute, ETH Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland

Correspondence should be addressed to Bin Hu; nc.ude.uzl@hb

Received 31 March 2017; Revised 3 June 2017; Accepted 12 June 2017; Published 25 July 2017

Academic Editor: Jianxin Wang

Copyright © 2017 Xiaowei Li et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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